Tag Archives: video

If you liked Amy Webb, you’ll love…

“Why can’t we make a computer to match lonely people with one thing in common: to fall in love with each other?” – En Vogue, 1992

 

Great news, En Vogue! Since 1992, we’ve actually built pretty robust computers that can do just that! I really enjoyed this video that looks inside the math of dating, take a peek for yourself this weekend.

TED Blog

For the past week, Amy Webb has been inspiring people to calculate their own algorithm for love. Her laugh-out-loud TED Talk, about reverse engineering her online dating profile and, essentially, data-ing her way into her perfect relationship has gotten a lot of attention, including on The Frisky and Pop Sugar. As Webb’s talk continues to take off online, here is what to watch next if her talk intrigued you and left you wanting more.

[ted_talkteaser id=307]
Helen Fisher: The brain on love
Love: it makes the world go ‘round, and has been found in 170 societies. But why? In this talk, Helen Fisher shares how she and her team put new couples, longterm couples and those who’ve just been dumped in MRIs, and what they’ve learned about our need for love based on this brain activity.
[ted_talkteaser id=1194]
Kevin Slavin: How algorithms shape our world
Algorithms are, basically…

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The Emotional Highs and Lows of Email. Yes, Email.

I totally understand where Domics is going with this animation about Email Etiquette! I often find myself scratching my head over the shortest replies, wondering if I’ve appropriately matched the tone, enthusiasm and content required by the receiver.

When I’m creating learning materials for clients, of course it’s important to match tone and language to the resource I’m developing, because it helps the content resonate with the learner. But when it comes to sending emails to colleagues and clients… maybe I should chill out a bit and stop over thinking it?

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A Player in the Local Democracy

It’s local election time in Auckland, but according to the NZ Herald, only 12% of Aucklanders have sent back their voting papers, which is really such a pity. Not only are we lucky to live in a democracy, we’re extra lucky to have a voting system that’s so easy to accommodate – all you need to do is tick some boxes then pop your voting paper in the post!

So this has gotten me thinking. Why don’t we vote? I think it’s too easy to just write it off as a mass of apathetic citizens… in fact, I’m starting to wonder if part of the problem is that not everyone understands civics and how our city is run. I’m not sure if it’s taught in schools. I only know the very basics myself, which I’ve picked up from here and there as an adult.

So when I came across this great little video about local elections and why it’s important to vote, I just had to share!

From an instructional design point of view, this is a very simple concept that would be easy to replicate in powerpoint or in Flash if you were so inclined. I found it engaging – moreso than if I had switched onto the 6 o’clock news and saw this as an opinion piece. It’s so easy for political issues, big and small, to become bogged down in detail, and become less accessible to the everyman, that I found this truly refreshing. Well done, Matai Media and 60s Civics!

PS: 60s Civics actually have a series of great videos that serve as introductions to government processes and structures (civics, a term not used all that often in NZ), a great starting point if you want to bone up on local government.

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