Tag Archives: thoughts

My Own Personal Image Collection

I don’t consider myself very good at social media – I’m too verbose for Twitter, too informal for Facebook (I friended too many family members and now I think that anything funny I have to say will offend someone) and I don’t have the attention span for Pinterest.

I’m pretty good at Instagram though. I always enjoyed photography class at school, and getting an iPhone with a decent camera in it was pretty exciting. I’m still impressed by the quality of the photos I can take using my phone. It occurred to me a few weeks back that I’m starting to form a pretty great personal image collection too. I’ve developed the habit of trying to take a photo myself before trawling the internet for a free version too – especially for photos of surfaces, textures and the like, which are pretty easy to pull together right here at home.

Below are a few PowerPoint slides I pulled together* using some images from my phone. They’re pretty good, I think!

Eat Fresh

Parks

Prints

*I pulled these together using my imagination. I love Auckland parks but I have no idea how many people go to them compared to pre-2011, and I’m not fashionable, so don’t wear stuff because I said so. Really.

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The Emotional Highs and Lows of Email. Yes, Email.

I totally understand where Domics is going with this animation about Email Etiquette! I often find myself scratching my head over the shortest replies, wondering if I’ve appropriately matched the tone, enthusiasm and content required by the receiver.

When I’m creating learning materials for clients, of course it’s important to match tone and language to the resource I’m developing, because it helps the content resonate with the learner. But when it comes to sending emails to colleagues and clients… maybe I should chill out a bit and stop over thinking it?

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Lost In Translation… Where There Is No Translation

Untranslatable

This post of ’11 Untranslatable Words From Other Cultures’ from Maptia Blog first appeared in my Twitter feed a few weeks back, and I just think it is wonderful. It really got me thinking about the relationship between words and their meanings – I think this piece actually celebrates the idea that feelings can transcend the most base elements of language. A feeling is more than ‘happy’ or ‘sad’, for instance. Rather, it might be Waldeinsamkeit!

You might be familiar with some common (and mostly German) words similar to these ones – zeitgeist, schadenfreude and the like – but there are many untranslatable words in many languages. Maptia did us a solid and put together 11 of the sweetest untranslatable words and illustrated them for us. If you’re looking for something to smile about today, make this it.

Image Credit: Maptia Blog

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Friday Infographic: 120 Years of Women’s Suffrage in NZ

Suffrage Clip1

This week we’re celebrating Women’s Suffrage Week in NZ, and it’s a big anniversary – 120 years! That’s right, NZ were the first country in the world to give women the vote. Bravo!

To mark the occasion, Statistics NZ released this very awesome infographic.

Elizabeth_Yates,_New_ZealandI particularly enjoy the ‘Female Firsts’ part of the graphic, which says that the first NZ female mayor was appointed in 1893. This was Elizabeth Yates, mayor of Onehunga from 1893-1894 and the first woman mayor in the whole British Empire. By the end of her term she had succeeded in reducing the debt of the council, kept the streets and footpaths maintained and lobbied for the Onehunga Cemetery Bill.

Image Credit: Statistics NZ, Wikipedia

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Shuffle Culture: How Apple Changed the Way we Listen to Music

Shuffle

I had never heard the idea of music played on ‘shuffle’ until I owned my first ipod in 2004.

The thought that I could import every single CD I owned into iTunes then set my music to shuffle so I’d effectively have my own personal jukebox was a revelation. To boot, I could make my own playlists which would kind of act like my own personal radio station, playing music of a particular genre at random, without pesky ads or DJs.

I was hooked, and so were millions of others who purchased iPods in the past ten years. As a mass we managed to create ‘shuffle culture’. The way people were listening to music actually changed,  and this change was created entirely by Apple.

Almost a decade later and I’m still a proud owner of several Apple devices (though I don’t think I qualify as a fangirl), but I’m starting to find shuffle kind of annoying. It seems that some playlists play the same set of tunes repeatedly, even when shuffling a thousand songs or more at a time. The frustration at this got me thinking about great albums that I love but haven’t listened to in long form for years.

So I started listening to music by the album recently – and it’s wonderful! Albums have become so much more interesting to me than the parts of the sum I had been listening to on shuffle.

How does this relate to instructional design? It doesn’t, not really, except it did get me thinking about how learning and especially instructional design at times seems to focus on producing small bites of information to be consumed ‘on the run’, in between work commitments and busy lives. This is all well and good, and I’m sure learners appreciate it, but are we at risk of losing the greater lesson or message of the work in the desperate need to keep learning brief and in morsel form? Just a thought.

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