Tag Archives: social media

Friday Infographic Fun: Bey Day

Ahh, I’m going to see Beyoncé at Vector Arena tonight! I’m beyond super excited for it. So to celebrate, here’s a fun Beyoncé infographic put together by The Guardian earlier this year.

Does Beyoncé seem to take herself a little too seriously sometimes? Yeah, but I guess if my name and image was a million dollar industry, I’d probably be a little serious too. I love the Guardian’s approach to this – it’s very tongue in cheek, very British.

Happy Bey Day!

 

Bonus image: a breakdown of the Single Ladies dance. I thought this was really clever, because it’s INSTANTLY recognisable, despite the fact there’s no text on the image at all. The directional lines are awesome, they really do bring movement to the static image. And in fabulous instructional design form, I can tell exactly what movement is required by the diagram. Bravo!

Infographic Source: The Guardian, Comatose Bunny via tumblr

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If you liked Amy Webb, you’ll love…

“Why can’t we make a computer to match lonely people with one thing in common: to fall in love with each other?” – En Vogue, 1992

 

Great news, En Vogue! Since 1992, we’ve actually built pretty robust computers that can do just that! I really enjoyed this video that looks inside the math of dating, take a peek for yourself this weekend.

TED Blog

For the past week, Amy Webb has been inspiring people to calculate their own algorithm for love. Her laugh-out-loud TED Talk, about reverse engineering her online dating profile and, essentially, data-ing her way into her perfect relationship has gotten a lot of attention, including on The Frisky and Pop Sugar. As Webb’s talk continues to take off online, here is what to watch next if her talk intrigued you and left you wanting more.

[ted_talkteaser id=307]
Helen Fisher: The brain on love
Love: it makes the world go ‘round, and has been found in 170 societies. But why? In this talk, Helen Fisher shares how she and her team put new couples, longterm couples and those who’ve just been dumped in MRIs, and what they’ve learned about our need for love based on this brain activity.
[ted_talkteaser id=1194]
Kevin Slavin: How algorithms shape our world
Algorithms are, basically…

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Shuffle Culture: How Apple Changed the Way we Listen to Music

Shuffle

I had never heard the idea of music played on ‘shuffle’ until I owned my first ipod in 2004.

The thought that I could import every single CD I owned into iTunes then set my music to shuffle so I’d effectively have my own personal jukebox was a revelation. To boot, I could make my own playlists which would kind of act like my own personal radio station, playing music of a particular genre at random, without pesky ads or DJs.

I was hooked, and so were millions of others who purchased iPods in the past ten years. As a mass we managed to create ‘shuffle culture’. The way people were listening to music actually changed,  and this change was created entirely by Apple.

Almost a decade later and I’m still a proud owner of several Apple devices (though I don’t think I qualify as a fangirl), but I’m starting to find shuffle kind of annoying. It seems that some playlists play the same set of tunes repeatedly, even when shuffling a thousand songs or more at a time. The frustration at this got me thinking about great albums that I love but haven’t listened to in long form for years.

So I started listening to music by the album recently – and it’s wonderful! Albums have become so much more interesting to me than the parts of the sum I had been listening to on shuffle.

How does this relate to instructional design? It doesn’t, not really, except it did get me thinking about how learning and especially instructional design at times seems to focus on producing small bites of information to be consumed ‘on the run’, in between work commitments and busy lives. This is all well and good, and I’m sure learners appreciate it, but are we at risk of losing the greater lesson or message of the work in the desperate need to keep learning brief and in morsel form? Just a thought.

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