Tag Archives: culture

Friday Fun with Infographics: Whedonverse Edition

movies-joss-whedon-whedonverse-infographic_1

Now, I’ve seen some pretty intense Whedonverse infographics in my time… there’s a lot of crossover in Joss’ work, and you can make a whole bunch of connections on different levels if you’re so inclined. Seriously, people study his work at university because it’s so impressively involved and intertwined.

Anywho, I quite fancy this basic infographic which shows how Whedon likes to reuse actors across different shows and films.

There’s a couple of really great instructional design techniques that I think are worth pointing out:

  • MIND MAP LAYOUT: the mind map style of this infographic makes it really engaging to look at, but it also makes the information contained in it look really accessible to the reader. Thumbs up.
  • USE OF KEY: I’m always appreciative of a good map key. This one is super straight forward, and therefore effective. Each film/show is represented by a colour, and the colour used to outline the character picture corresponds. Really straightforward, gets the point across, and doesn’t really ‘interfere’ with the information. It’s just sitting there in a really convenient way.

I’m not so sure about the illustration of Joss used as the central image… it’s a great illustration, but I find it weird having the ‘master’ of the work portrayed in character, while all the other images used are photos. Maybe they could have just used a photo of Joss for design consistency?

Click on the image to see the infographic in full. Have a great weekend, y’all!

Infographic Source: DigitalSpy.co.nz

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Friday Infographic Fun: Bey Day

Ahh, I’m going to see Beyoncé at Vector Arena tonight! I’m beyond super excited for it. So to celebrate, here’s a fun Beyoncé infographic put together by The Guardian earlier this year.

Does Beyoncé seem to take herself a little too seriously sometimes? Yeah, but I guess if my name and image was a million dollar industry, I’d probably be a little serious too. I love the Guardian’s approach to this – it’s very tongue in cheek, very British.

Happy Bey Day!

 

Bonus image: a breakdown of the Single Ladies dance. I thought this was really clever, because it’s INSTANTLY recognisable, despite the fact there’s no text on the image at all. The directional lines are awesome, they really do bring movement to the static image. And in fabulous instructional design form, I can tell exactly what movement is required by the diagram. Bravo!

Infographic Source: The Guardian, Comatose Bunny via tumblr

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If you liked Amy Webb, you’ll love…

“Why can’t we make a computer to match lonely people with one thing in common: to fall in love with each other?” – En Vogue, 1992

 

Great news, En Vogue! Since 1992, we’ve actually built pretty robust computers that can do just that! I really enjoyed this video that looks inside the math of dating, take a peek for yourself this weekend.

TED Blog

For the past week, Amy Webb has been inspiring people to calculate their own algorithm for love. Her laugh-out-loud TED Talk, about reverse engineering her online dating profile and, essentially, data-ing her way into her perfect relationship has gotten a lot of attention, including on The Frisky and Pop Sugar. As Webb’s talk continues to take off online, here is what to watch next if her talk intrigued you and left you wanting more.

[ted_talkteaser id=307]
Helen Fisher: The brain on love
Love: it makes the world go ‘round, and has been found in 170 societies. But why? In this talk, Helen Fisher shares how she and her team put new couples, longterm couples and those who’ve just been dumped in MRIs, and what they’ve learned about our need for love based on this brain activity.
[ted_talkteaser id=1194]
Kevin Slavin: How algorithms shape our world
Algorithms are, basically…

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A Player in the Local Democracy

It’s local election time in Auckland, but according to the NZ Herald, only 12% of Aucklanders have sent back their voting papers, which is really such a pity. Not only are we lucky to live in a democracy, we’re extra lucky to have a voting system that’s so easy to accommodate – all you need to do is tick some boxes then pop your voting paper in the post!

So this has gotten me thinking. Why don’t we vote? I think it’s too easy to just write it off as a mass of apathetic citizens… in fact, I’m starting to wonder if part of the problem is that not everyone understands civics and how our city is run. I’m not sure if it’s taught in schools. I only know the very basics myself, which I’ve picked up from here and there as an adult.

So when I came across this great little video about local elections and why it’s important to vote, I just had to share!

From an instructional design point of view, this is a very simple concept that would be easy to replicate in powerpoint or in Flash if you were so inclined. I found it engaging – moreso than if I had switched onto the 6 o’clock news and saw this as an opinion piece. It’s so easy for political issues, big and small, to become bogged down in detail, and become less accessible to the everyman, that I found this truly refreshing. Well done, Matai Media and 60s Civics!

PS: 60s Civics actually have a series of great videos that serve as introductions to government processes and structures (civics, a term not used all that often in NZ), a great starting point if you want to bone up on local government.

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Another Friday Infographic: Superhero Life Expectancies

Spidey Years

This Superhero Life Expectancies infographic by Design Infographics is simple and really easy to follow – it’s also pretty funny. I happen to agree with all their predictions too!

Have a great weekend everyone!

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Lost In Translation… Where There Is No Translation

Untranslatable

This post of ’11 Untranslatable Words From Other Cultures’ from Maptia Blog first appeared in my Twitter feed a few weeks back, and I just think it is wonderful. It really got me thinking about the relationship between words and their meanings – I think this piece actually celebrates the idea that feelings can transcend the most base elements of language. A feeling is more than ‘happy’ or ‘sad’, for instance. Rather, it might be Waldeinsamkeit!

You might be familiar with some common (and mostly German) words similar to these ones – zeitgeist, schadenfreude and the like – but there are many untranslatable words in many languages. Maptia did us a solid and put together 11 of the sweetest untranslatable words and illustrated them for us. If you’re looking for something to smile about today, make this it.

Image Credit: Maptia Blog

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Today’s Find: Minimal Posters

Euclid

Minimal Posters – Five Great Mathematicians and Their Contributions

I stumbled upon this beautiful collection of posters by Hydrogene earlier today, they’re simply stunning.

I’m really quite useless with numbers and confused by math, but I recognised all the names on the posters, and the images too – but I wouldn’t have put the names and images together independently. I suspect a lot of other people are the same.

This is a great example minimalist design – it contains only essential information, and the idea is simple but striking in it’s simplicity. And I LEARNED something from it, or rather it compounded a learning from my school days. This is a beautiful all-rounder!

I recommend taking a peek at their whole portfolio, there’s some amazing work in there.

Image Credit: Hydrogene

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Shuffle Culture: How Apple Changed the Way we Listen to Music

Shuffle

I had never heard the idea of music played on ‘shuffle’ until I owned my first ipod in 2004.

The thought that I could import every single CD I owned into iTunes then set my music to shuffle so I’d effectively have my own personal jukebox was a revelation. To boot, I could make my own playlists which would kind of act like my own personal radio station, playing music of a particular genre at random, without pesky ads or DJs.

I was hooked, and so were millions of others who purchased iPods in the past ten years. As a mass we managed to create ‘shuffle culture’. The way people were listening to music actually changed,  and this change was created entirely by Apple.

Almost a decade later and I’m still a proud owner of several Apple devices (though I don’t think I qualify as a fangirl), but I’m starting to find shuffle kind of annoying. It seems that some playlists play the same set of tunes repeatedly, even when shuffling a thousand songs or more at a time. The frustration at this got me thinking about great albums that I love but haven’t listened to in long form for years.

So I started listening to music by the album recently – and it’s wonderful! Albums have become so much more interesting to me than the parts of the sum I had been listening to on shuffle.

How does this relate to instructional design? It doesn’t, not really, except it did get me thinking about how learning and especially instructional design at times seems to focus on producing small bites of information to be consumed ‘on the run’, in between work commitments and busy lives. This is all well and good, and I’m sure learners appreciate it, but are we at risk of losing the greater lesson or message of the work in the desperate need to keep learning brief and in morsel form? Just a thought.

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